Tag Archives: Community

Persevering

As I get ready to head out to Eugene Oregon for my first race of the season many things come to mind. All the hours of training I’ve put in, the ups and downs of the last few months and why I even do this to begin with.  We wall face challenges in not just running but in life.  I think these two articles sum up eloquently the courage of never giving up, to persevere against the odds and coming out the other side.

By Laura Kantor

Sixteen months ago, a friend helped me realize how self-defeating thoughts and behaviors were affecting every area of my life, including my running and racing goals. Running took a back seat last year while I did difficult work with my therapist to improve the rest of my life. Way Too Cool was the first race where it was apparent how far I have come and how much my mindset has improved.

 

Resurfacing
April 29, 2016
Written by Andy Jones

image

Resurfacing April 29, 2016 Written by Andy Jones After 48 years of life I have come to realize that there are few pleasures greater than getting something back after you’ve lost it. Losing can be so sorrowful, so depressing, so definitive, that having the chance to get something back, having that golden opportunity to find again that which you’ve missed so much, can be at once rewarding and humbling. And, it can help us to be reborn.

Advertisements

Some things I’ve learned along the way

Recently a friend who is going to be running in her first 100k race the Gorge Waterfalls 100k, asked me for some race day advice.  I also ran this same event last year as my first 100k race and I learned a lot from the experience.  I gladly shared some of my insights as I wished to help her as best I could.  This spurred the idea that I should share with others as well.  I’ve learned so much from fellow runners since I ventured into ultra running and I don’t think I would have made it this far on my own without their generosity.  Certainly not without a lot more pain, angst and slower progress.   This is by no means a comprehensive list, but a few important things that have been key in improving my race day performance.

009

Racing in the S.O.B. 50 miler in 2015.

Run your own race.  When starting out in a race it’s easy to get caught up in all the excitement. Adrenaline is flowing, everyone is rested and happy and it’s oh so easy to push harder than you should.  If you are not paying attention you won’t even realize you are clipping along way faster than you should be. Know what your race pace is and stick to it. Following someone else’s pace or simply running too hard up that first hill climb will eventually catch up to you towards the latter stages of the race.

Be consistent in your training.  Putting in consistent mileage, time on your feet, week in and week out helps prepare your body for the pounding it will take on race day.

Listen to your body.  If something starts niggling at you don’t be overly stubborn and just keep pushing through it. This can lead to injury.  Better to ease back on training a bit before something becomes a major issue.  Be sensible in your training.  Don’t get obsessed with reaching a specific mileage every week but instead be flexible as sometimes you get sick, get a minor injury or are just plain tired and on the verge of over training so know when to take an extra rest day.  Better to miss a work out or two so you avoid injury and come back to your next run well rested and refreshed.  And don’t forget to get enough sleep.  You are pushing your body and it needs plenty of time to recuperate and it can’t do it properly without enough rest.

Practice using your equipment prior to race day.  The first few hours of my first 100k race was in total darkness. The trails were single track, tight and rocky with sections with sheer drops down steep slopes. My headlamp of choice was lacking in a major way. It was great for rummaging around in a tent, but did hardly anything to light up the trail before me.  I was extremely happy to see the sun come out later that morning.

Same goes for fueling needs.  Know what you’ll be using and have it thoroughly tried out before the race.   Also know what may be available at the aid stations, but realize that supplies run out and other things happen so not everything will be there as advertised.  Don’t try eating or drinking something new during the race. You just don’t know if it will cause you stomach issues later down the trail.

Train on similar terrain as you’ll experience in the race.  If it’s a hilly course, verify the amount of elevation gain and loss and prepare for it.  Will it likely be a warm day or cool?  High humidity or relatively dry? Expect the worst and hope for the best in what mother nature will throw at you.  Better to have that extra layer of clothing or rain gear and not use it than to be stuck out in cold, windy, wet conditions and suddenly find yourself extremely uncomfortable or even hypothermic.

Seek advice from those who’ve been there. Don’t ignore the old coot in your local running group who looks like he could be your dad or even grandpa. He may very well have decades of experience and sage advice to offer. At one time he might have been able to run circles around you before time slowed him down.

Stay inspired. Set personal goals, daily, weekly and yearly to help motivate yourself.  Have multiple goals set prior to a race.  My first goal is always to just finish and have fun.  My second goal is a finishing time that I think my training prior to the race makes realistically attainable.  Lastly, if I’m really “on” during the race then I shoot for the last goal which may be a PR for that race or distance, or finishing in the top 20% or top three in my age bracket, etc.  By having multiple goals and being flexible with them during the race will help you keep moving when things get rough.  When in such a rough spot you will have to acknowledge that a PR is just not happening today, but you will realize you can still enjoy yourself out there and finish with a sense of accomplishment.

Use social media to your benefit. Strava, Facebook and others can help you connect with other runners, find new trails, see how others train and get involved with running groups.

Read, read and read some more. The library, magazines, online blogs podcasts and websites can all be a wealth of information.  Just be sure the source is a credible one.  In my town one local shoe store carries books you can check out like a library.  They have books available that my library may not and if I really love the book I can purchase it from them.  Also, if your local library doesn’t carry a book you are interested in ask them to obtain it on loan from another branch.  You might even be surprised that they may be willing to purchase it to add to their collection.  I will list specific books, publications, web sites and podcast that I’ve found helpful in another post.  For now try reaching out and exploring on your own.

image

Taking in the beauty of the surroundings while on a training run.

Lastly, have a life outside of running.  I believe it’s helpful and healthy to have other interests.  Sometimes these can be complementary to your running.  I myself have enjoyed photographing the natural landscape for years before running came along.  I currently don’t pursue it as I used to, but I am not hesitant to spend some time photographing even if it means stopping during a long training run to pull out the camera and taking a few snaps of the scenery in front of me that I find so inspiring  I also believe we need to be mindful that we don’t become so obsessed with running that these other parts of our lives begin to suffer such as your job and especially your family and friends.  They often help us make running and attending races possible.  They may have endured countless hours of hearing about our latest training runs, injuries, races, new gear we’d love to have etc. So be sure to give back plenty of love and friendship as well.  They deserve it.

216

My son helping finish. My family supports and inspires me!

Hopefully some of you found some of this useful and feel free to leave your own comments with further suggestions.  Until next time, happy trails!

 

Elite Marathoner Prevents Apparent Suicide Attempt During Run

Elite runner Adriana Nelson was out for an easy 4-mile run on Thursday evening in Folsom, Calif., when she came across a man she sensed

Source: Elite Marathoner Prevents Apparent Suicide Attempt During Run

My Local Running Community and the Dynamic Duo

imageAs a trail runner and recent ultra runner convert I am so fortunate to live in Bend, Oregon. Not just because of the plethora of running opportunities on the National Forest Trails, Three Sisters Wilderness trails, Smith Rock state park to name a few, but also because of the awesome running community. As I’ve learned about how to run starting from my first half marathon in 2009 to my first 100k last year I’ve been able to learn much from so many individuals. From long time local runners who showed me where to go run and inspired with their never waning passion even in their advanced years, free training group runs and just the great openness of more experienced runners willing to share their knowledge. Add to that the large number of elite runners here with the same openness and attitudes it all adds up to a wonderful place to be as a runner. Take the latest example. Two great local runners Denise Baroussa and Jeff Browning both ran a great race at the Hurt 100. Not only that but they both won in dominating fashion. It was a lot of fun to watch online as updates came in via Ultra SignUp throughout the race and updates and photos via Facebook. Being able to root for a couple of local runners who make themselves available to the average runner such as myself makes it all the more meaningful and fun.

image

image

A week later upon their return from the tropical paradise of Hawaii a couple of local running companies, Recharge and Footzone threw together an informal party to congratulate them. People mingled and talked of the race and running while sipping on great local brews. Denise and Jeff both graciously did a Q and A session with those in attendance. It was an opportunity for them to relive their well earned victories a bit longer and share their experiences. This was another opportunity for myself to learn a bit more on running and racing and get some more inspiration. I certainly am lucky to call Bend home.

image

Group runs

This last weekend I had an opportunity to join some other local runners for a fun run. Most of those who participated seemed to know one another already and the intent was for runners and their families to gather together before the start of the holiday season. However an invite was posted on a public forum on Strava and since I was part of this Strava group I thought it would be fun to meet some of these runners in person outside of cyber space. Although the majority were faster, more accomplished runners then myself and seemed to already all be friends I was welcomed into their circle and had fun at the event.

image

First Annual Stilly con Chili Trail Run

This reminded me of the general great attitude of the running community at large. When I began taking my first strides as a runner I joined a local running group CORK (Central Oregon Running Klub) on the weekends for runs. As I was still new to town I didn’t know of many places to run. I got the opportunity to learn about the local trails and made some friends and drew inspiration from some of the older runners. These individuals were well into retirement age and beyond and were out there hitting the trails and running races. It was a real eye opener for me. The last few years I try to regularly attend a weekly group called TPG (Tuesday Performance Group) . The focus is on speed work and all levels of runners are welcome to attend.  When I began attending I was certainly one of the slower and out of shape runners. I also had no clue what speed work, tempo and intervals even meant. But again as I’ve found over and over in various groups and even races I was never looked down upon and always felt welcome and encouraged throughout.
So if you are new to running or prefer running solo, as I do most of the time, I encourage you to check out what your local community offers and give it a go. At the worst you’ll decide it’s just not for you.  More likely you’ll gain knowledge, inspiration and a few friendships along the way. Happy trails!

%d bloggers like this: